Why Illustrations Are Important to Everyone

Not everyone is blessed with the gift of speech or writing. At the other end of the line, it is also true that not everyone has the capacity to fully understand what they are listening or reading about. There lies the need to bridge the gap of these two groups of people. The solution is to include illustrations.

Illustrations are basically visual representations of whatever is being said or written. It helps in conveying the message to whoever it is intended to.

There was a time when you had to listen or to read properly in order to get the message. Those relaying the message knew as well that there was no other way, and they had better do something about it. However, starting in the nineteenth century, several technological advances became available to make everything more visual.

This has continued today, and as a result, more people are less acute to reading long paragraphs or hearing winded statements. If a person sees several hours in a computer or television, chances are, he or she is part of a large group who would respond better with illustrations.

Graduate students tag along drawings and figures so that their presentations can be given better-than-average marks. Entrepreneurs pitch their ideas to investors by including sketches and flowcharts for their ideas. Businesspersons expound and arrive to concluding by showing graphs together with their reports.

Reports around the world have become much easier on the eyes today, thanks to presentation software. With programs like Microsoft PowerPoint, it became possible to improve one's message through animation, graphics, and video.

In general, it became apparent that illustrations would become more popular with the advent of computers. Creating flowcharts, plans, and entire designs became quicker to produce and easier on the budget. Today, illustrations appear in different forms together, and all are able to convey a message.

Computers even put to rest some issues. Some might ask, Is a table of values ​​an illustration? In some respects, it is because it provides an easy comparison for the audience. However, one can argue that there's a lot of people who have an aversion to numbers as much as those with little attention span. We now know that it's better to simply convert a table into a graph, so that trends can easily be seen.

Today's challenge is to reduce the number of misleading and outright false message using illustrations. It seems that everyone wants to capitalize the public's need for visuals that they simply hide imperfections behind illustrations or simply put them in fine print. In almost all media, people are bombarded with claims that are supported with illustrations or graphs. The problem is that such illustrations do not represent the actual features of a product. There have been a lot of consumers who are being enticed by things that they see only to find out they are not getting what they expect from it.

If Someone is Erasing Or Deleting Their Text Messages, is it a Sign of Cheating?

I often hear from people who can not help but notice that their husband, wife, boyfriend, or girlfriend has been increasingly sending and receiving text messages. However, when they go to check up on those texts, they've often been deleted or erased.

I often hear comments like: "my husband will go and try to find privacy when he's texting. I'll see he has a mischievous and excited look on his face and I get a feeling of dread in the pit of my stomach. when I get a hold of the phone later to see who he's been texting and what he's been saying, I find that he's deleted his entire history. What is going on? Should I be worried that he's cheating on me and using his cell phone to do it? "

These concerns are most definitely valid. Statistics show that it's increasingly common for people to get cating cheating from their cell phones. And, it's very tempting for cheaters to sending playful and flirtatious texts to someone who you are cheating with. Plus, the cheater often thinks that all they have to do is hit the delete button to erase all evidence of wrongdoing. (This assumption can be just plain wrong.)

If you confront your loved one about the deleted texts, they'll often tell you that they were trying to save memory on their phone or that it's just their habit not to let their messages clutter up their phone. And, I suppose there are cases where this is a valid excuse. But, it will often help to look at how soon after the message's use that they are actually deleting it. It's less problematic if they let the message sit there for days or weeks before they get around to erasing it. But, if they're erasing immediately after it's sent or received, then this becomes a good bit more suspicious.

If your loved one is even reasonably tech savvy (and they are very likely if they're constantly messaging, then they are reasonably know that they can easily set their phone to automatically delete old messages after a specified period of time so that having to go in and manually do this is really over kill.

What To Do When Your Loved One Is Constantly Deleting Their Texts: As I see it, you have a few choices here. You can ask or confront them about this, but I have to tell you that an extremely large majority of cheaters will firmly deny any wrong doing. You can ask yourself if there are any places where you're seeing odd behaviors (like at the computer) and then try to follow up and check those places. You can also check the call log, photos, and sent emails. There is software that allows you to go back in and read the texts and only you can decide if you want to take this that far.

I think it often comes down to the other behaviors that surround the messaging and whether or not you believe that this is all innocent or not. And, if you've found this article, I suspect that you might feel like there is more to this than saving phone memory. Sometimes this is not the case, but many times, it is.

The Hopi and Their Jewelry

Hopi Silver Overlay Jewelry

The jewelry of the Hopi has a style distinct from that of the other Native Americans. The Hopi are known for the use of silver overlay, which utilizes a technique of fusing two layers of silver. The eye-catching and often elaborate design is on the top layer, while the bottom layers serves as a base.

It was not so long ago that the Hopi developed this technique. In fact the Hopi were not much into the making of silver. In their relative isolation on the northeastern Arizona high plains, or mesas, they were somewhat firewalled (so to speak) against external influences. Even their interaction with other Native Americans was limited.

Silversmithing of Native Americans

So while the Navajo learned and developed their silversmithing skills, a technique brought to the south-west of the American continent by the Spaniards, and which was then taken up by the Zuni, the Hopi were still practicing their own artistic heritage based on weaving and pottery. They were also adept at the making of kachina dolls, for which they deservedly remain renowned.

Time, of course, would not stand still, and even reliably isolated communities began to open up. Trading and commerce grew and the Hopi through their interaction with the Zuni exposed them to the craft of silver jewelry, at which the Zuni were now skilled. Lanyade, a Zuni, learned his silversmithing from the Navajo, and began to sell his silver jewelry. He travelled among the Hopi and Sikyatala became his student in 1898.

Sikyatala

Sikyatala is credited to be the first Hopi silversmith. It is reported that while Lanyade was at the Hopi reservation for four months, making and selling his silver jewelry pieces, Sikyatala was studiously observing and learning from the master at close range.

Sikyatala then began to use the technique of making silver jewelry. Other Hopi also began to follow and emulate the work of Sikyatala. In time the Hopi developed their own style, that of using overlay silver.

Hopi Silversmiths Paul Saufie and Fred Kabote

This technique did not so much evolve as was created by the Hopi silversmiths Paul Saufkie and Fred Kabote who were involved in a program at the Museum of Northern Arizona in 1938. After World War II the Hopi Guild was formed to encourage a program of silversmith training .

The designs of the silver overlay jewelry of the Hopi were also unique in that they adapted designs from the old broken pottery pieces of the 15th and 16th centuries. New motifs were also incorporated by the Hopi Guild, including kachina symbols.

The cross-currents in Native American jewelry nowdays mean that there are cross-influences as well. And different styles from the different currents may well find themselves evident in any piece of modern American Native jewelry.

But the fascinating development of Native American silversmiths and their crafts, in their different streams of artistic design, does not entirely obscure the original creativity. The silver overlay technique was the creation of the Hopi, even if it may now be employed by others.

Michael Kabotie

In ending, it may be noted that the work of Fred Kabote was continued by his son Michael Kabote (also spelled 'Kabotie'). Michael Kabotie recently passed away at the age of 67. He was a trail-blazer in the Native American fine arts movement, both as a Hopi artist and jeweler. His paintings were well-received, depicting traditional Hopi life. For a number of years, he also tapped the Hopi overlay technique at the Idyllwild Arts program in Southern California.

6 Tips About Extended Warrantys For Your Automobile

Like any other insurance, you get what you pay for and trying to save a few dollars may not get you the coverage you need. The following are some basic tips to keep in mind when you are considering an extended warranty policy.

1. The first this you should ask yourself is whether or not you need an extended warranty.

On average, most auto manufacturers offer a 3 year or 36,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty. However, if your drive more the 12,000 mile per year and plan to keep your vehicle for a long time, then an extended warranty may be what you are looking for to get that peace of mind.

2. How reliable is your car? You should take a look at the reliability history of your automobile. Even though this is not fail-safe, it will give you an idea of ​​how much service you can expect. This information should be kept in mind when looking at an extended warranty.

3. What is the track record and history of the company?

Here are some question to ask yourself about the company:

– How long have they been in business? – How quickly do they payout to get a repair? – Do they offer roadside assistance? – Are there testimonials from other consumers you can read? – What is they standing with Better Business Bureau and other consumer watchdogs?

4. What about the repairs, can they be done at any repair shop? It's best to choose an extended warranty that, at the very least, gives you more than one service facility to choose from. You'll most certainly appreciate this if your vehicle ever need service while you're on a road trip, miles away from home.

5. How do you know which plan is right for you? If you want bumper-to-bumper coverage the up front cost will be higher, but this offers the most coverage. If you select a higher deduction per repair and you automobile is trouble pron, you may end up spending more money in the long run. Read the fine print!

Here are some questions to ask when selecting a plan:

– Is the plan transferable or renewable? – Where can you have the repairs done? – Do you have to outlay cash up front for the repairs and wait for a reimbursement? – Does the plan offer any roadside assistance? If you travel a lot or have long commutes, this type of plan may be just right for you. With travel assistance you can get:

– car rental reimbursement – food and lodging – flat tires repaired – gas if you run on empty – a tow – and etc.

6. If you make the decision to get an extended warranty, there are three type to choose from: – Manufacturer: Typically, no problems about the cost of a repair but this has the highest up front costs and repair shop may be limited in your area. – Dealer: has a lower up front cost and you get the plan at the same place you bought the vehicle, but there is usually only one point of service for repairs. – Independent: has the lowest up front costs, typically 30% to 50% lower than manufacturers and dealers, however, coverage may not be as expected.